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Sean Bean on Waterloo

Sean Bean on Waterloo - Part One

Series 1, Episode 1

Sean Bean on Waterloo - Part One

Waterloo – one of the most significant battles in British history. To this day the battle remains a key moment in the British psyche and commemorations of the battle remain visible in various formats: songs, poems, street names and stations for instance.

Waterloo’s legendary reputation is well-deserved, as its result shaped the map of Europe for over a century. Dutch, Germans, Prussians, English, Scots, Welsh and Irish – all would fight on the same side at Waterloo as they aimed to sound the death knell of France’s legendary commander: Napoleon Bonaparte.

Many consider Napoleon Bonaparte to be the greatest military commander in history. Prior to 1814, he had had embarked on a twenty-year quest to see France as the top dog in Europe.

Despite gaining many famous victories, the French emperor was eventually overwhelmed by enemies and forced to abdicate on 6 April 1914, being exiled to Elba. Yet Napoleon did not remain there for long.

Three months before the Battle of Waterloo, Napoleon Bonaparte had escaped from his exile on the island of Elba and regained control of France.

Now he planned to attack Brussels in Belgium, where two of his greatest enemies were gathering armies: General Leberecht von Blucher of Prussia and British General Arthur Wellesley, better known as the Duke of Wellington.

After gaining initial success, Napoleon marched to attack Wellington’s army just south of Brussels. His foe had been anticipating the battle and had set up his army in a strong, defensive position near a small village: Waterloo.

In this two-part documentary, Hollywood star Sean Bean (Sharpe series, Goldeneye, Lord of the Rings, Game of Thrones, Troy and many more) explores what it was like to have been a soldier on the field of battle at Waterloo on 18 June 1815.

Using eyewitness accounts, experience a ground-level view of the battle that changed history – a view of the battle that the real Richard Sharpe would have witnessed.

 Read more Read less Duration: 44 Min